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LibreOffice 7.3 Office Suite Gets First Point Release, Almost 100 Bugs Were Fixed

LibreOffice 7.3

The Document Foundation announced today the release general availability of LibreOffice 7.3.1 as the first point release to the latest and greatest LibreOffice 7.3 open-source, free and cross-platform office suite.

LibreOffice 7.3.1 is here exactly one month after LibreOffice 7.3 to fix a bunch of bugs and issues that would prevent you from successfully using the popular office suite software for any of your home office needs.

A total of 98 issues were addressed in this first point release to provide solutions to several LibreOffice 7.3 bugs, including the Auto Calculate regression on the Calc component, along with crashes when running Calc without AVX instructions.

LibreOffice 7.3.1 is also here to further improve interoperability with proprietary document formats like DOCX, XLSX, and PPTX. For details on these bug fixes, check out the RC1, RC2, and RC3 changelogs.

If you have the LibreOffice 7.3 suite installed on your GNU/Linux distribution, you should be able to update to the LibreOffice 7.3.1 point release in the coming days. Users of DEB and RPM-based distros like Debian GNU/Linux/Ubuntu or Fedora Linux/openSUSE can download the LibreOffice 7.3.1 binaries right now from the official website.

However, please keep in mind that this is the ‘Community’ edition of LibreOffice, which means that if you’re deploying the software on enterprise environments and you need support from The Document Foundation, you’ll have to rely on the LibreOffice Enterprise family of applications from ecosystem partners.

The next planned update in the LibreOffice 7.3 series is LibreOffice 7.3.2, which is currently scheduled for the end of March or in early April 2022 with more bug fixes and improved document compatibility for those dealing with proprietary document formats, especially from the MS Office productivity suite.

LibreOffice 7.3 will be supported with a total of seven maintenance updates until November 30th, 2022.

Image credits: The Document Foundation

Last updated 2 months ago